How to Deal with an Employee’s Online Behavior

On March 19th, 2012, wrote:

Almost every company has some sort of rules set in place when it comes to social networking / online behavior and the office—do not “connect” with people in the office on a personal account, do not talk about the company on a personal account, do not talk about anything that happens on a social networking account in the office, etc. However, a company really cannot tell someone what they can and cannot do on their personal accounts if it does not involve the company. People also have free reign when it comes to commenting on different articles across the Web, and it is impossible for a company to monitor this at all times. For this reason, companies often have to deal with behavior online that may not be up to company standards. The reason social media is so popular is because you can be yourself. You can promote something professionally and help build your personal brand, or you can connect – Read the full article

Social Media Damage Control

On April 18th, 2011, wrote:

Whether your business has 100 followers or 100,000 fans, you’ve probably already realized that your community needs to be cultivated – and monitored – on social media channels weekly, if not daily. Recent news about the Taco Bell class-action lawsuit, which was filed against Taco Bell for “misrepresenting the contents of its beef,” is nothing surprising. I’m sure most customers don’t expect they are eating wholesome, organic meals at Taco Bell. However, it’s not the lawsuit that is interesting here; it is the way that Taco Bell warded off a potential crisis by being proactive and effectual on social media. Taco Bell has already gotten some previous press for their impressive works on Facebook and Twitter; but this is more impressive, and the way they turned this particular misrepresented beef crisis into something positive is a great lesson for Internet marketers as well as for online reputation management professionals. First step: Address the issue A confident and clear message doesn’t – Read the full article

Social Analytics Tools for Measuring the Impact of Your Social Media Marketing Campaign

On March 25th, 2011, wrote:

When businesses, brand managers, and marketers talk about social media, there’s always one acronym that’s always being brought up: ROI. It is, of course, perfectly reasonable. One needs numbers, results, and reasons for going social. (Well, at least one needs these things if “going social” is part of what’s called “work”.) One needs to justify the amount of money and effort spent on campaigns on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube. Not just justify, actually, but also monitor, measure, and manage. Good thing we have all kinds of apps and tools for gathering intelligence (about our efforts and that of competitors). It’s challenging enough finding ways to write retweetable tweets, increase follower counts and expand fan bases, design Like-able Facebook pages, or go viral with video. But to take things like “perception”, “engagement”, “feedback”, and “sentiment” and try to pull out numbers from these, too? How does one begin to quantify any of that? So like we said: good thing we have so – Read the full article

Google Alerts for Reputation Monitoring

On December 18th, 2010, wrote:

There’s a lot of hype in the social media realm over the dozens of new tools and dashboards that help you keep an eye on what people are saying about your company. Indeed, online reputation monitoring and management is quickly becoming a must-have for your marketing strategy. It is every business owner’s dream to be able to keep tabs on their brand name. Now, they can swoop in and clean up after a dirty situation. Likewise, they can reward or thank people for good mentions. Social media is growing at an enormous rate, but it still makes up only a relatively small portion of the Internet. There are billions of websites and blogs that also like to talk about things. Many of those sites have a reach comparable to or larger than the social mentions that are happening around your brand. Reputation monitoring goes beyond social media: you should be monitoring the whole Internet. Before you spend money on expensive – Read the full article

Why You Should Love KnowEm

On October 4th, 2010, wrote:

What if you could control and monitor your image across all social media? What if you could sign up for all the important social media sites out there and hear all the conversations being made about your business or brand? It sounds like a lot of work, but not if you’ve heard of KnowEm. A few months back we wrote a post that focused on this extremely useful social media service, which, as a kind of username detective, basically helps small business owners, startups, or even enterprises and larger companies check for the use of their brand, product, trademark, personal name, or username instantly on over 400 popular and emerging social networks or social media sites – including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Foursquare, Multiply, WordPress, MySpace, Formspring, Blogger, Posterous, and many more. KnowEm is a great brand management tool, too. You can grab your name and secure your brand before someone else does – someone who doesn’t have the authority for – Read the full article